Thursday, 23 March 2017

REVIEW: Greenhorn / Urchin - "Greenhorn / Urchin" (Split)

By: Stephen Murray

Album Type: Split
Date Released: 10/03/2017
Label: Independent




“Greenhorn/Urchin” DD//LP Track listing:

1. Greenhorn – “The Narrator”
2. Urchin – “Meteor Blade”

The Review:

What is it with the sea and some of doom’s more sombre bands? The rich nautical repertoire of songs about the hauntings of dead sailors, ghost ships and ungainly, ill-omened seabirds notwithstanding, the Big Water has proved an irresistible draw for many bands. Indeed, there appears to be three themes prevalent in doom right now: the sea, the occult and H.P. Lovecraft, and the greatest of these is Lovecraft (go on, argue for the occult; I’m listening).

Written over three months and recorded live in a few hours, albeit with two different vocal sessions, Greenhorn’s “The Narrator” evokes the sea through a petroleum-jelly-soft Lovecraftian lens. Not to say this track lacks throat, rather that it balances gnarled guitar tones that roil and gurgle with the allure and seduction of ethereal Siren calls rendered in beautiful-if-creepy sung harmonies. The rich vintage glow swathed about both guitar and bass in the solos satisfies like muscovado sugar, bringing melody to the fore of the song’s nigh twenty minute span.

And this is why it is so well paired with Urchins “Meteor Blade.” We are back down to the forbidding water’s edge, but more than that, we have a vintage feel and a haunting, darkling melody carefully stitched onto something primal and untamed. The vintage here is different, however, calling back cassette tapes left to go brittle on a sunbleached dashboard and the hazy reverb of the 90s alternative scene. Indeed, halfway through the song a delicate, woozy melody leverages a fair slab of pathos before breaking out once again in wails of agony.

Altogether a well-matched release allowing both acts to shine their own eerie lights, and with plenty of aggro, but with the emotional variation and nostalgic tones selling it.

“Greenhorn/Urchin” is available for download here (Greenhorn) and here (Urchin)




Wednesday, 22 March 2017

ALBUM REVIEW: Black Star Riders - "Heavy Fire"

By: Richard Maw

Album Type: Full Length
Date Released: 03/02/2017
Label: Nuclear Blast

 
“Let's not mince words here, this is straightforward hard rock. Big choruses, big sounds and big hooks are the order of the day. The production is superb; thick and muscular with the right amount of polish.  Black Star Riders have proved, again, that they are a fine hard rock proposition in their own right and with a strong work ethic, great live show and several albums under their belts, the band seem primed to rule the hard rock circuit.”

“Heavy Fire” CD//DD//LP track listing:

1. Heavy Fire (4:28)
2. When The Night Comes In (3:16)
3. Dancing With The Wrong Girl (3:21)
4. Who Rides The Tiger (4:20)
5. Cold War Love (4:05)
6. Testify Or Say Goodbye (4:17)
7. Thinking About You Could Get Me Killed (3:38)
8. True Blue Kid (4:17)
9. Ticket To Rise (4:38)
10. Letting Go Of Me (3:44)

The Review:

Black Star Riders are back with another full length studio album. Their line-up has never been consistent, but mainstays Scott Gorham (yes, Thin Lizzy) and Ricky Warwick are still the driving forces along with Damon Johnson and Jimmy Degrasso. The band are on rollicking form here; fans of The Almighty will recognise Warwick's writing style in the opening title track and elsewhere on the record.

Let's not mince words here, this is straightforward hard rock. Big choruses, big sounds and big hooks are the order of the day. The production is superb; thick and muscular with the right amount of polish. BSR grew out of the touring Thin Lizzy line up and you can certainly hear that- as you could on the preceding albums. This time, though, there is more of the band's own stamp on things.

Certainly, “Dancing With The Wrong Gir”l sounds very Lizzy- but “When The Night Comes In” sounds much less so. Warwick's references to god and guns are very much present and correct (as a rock n roll motif, not as an endorsement of either, you understand!). Over the ten tracks there are more restrained moments such as “Cold War Love”, out and out rockers like “Who Rides The Tiger”, familiar harmonies such as those on “Testify Or Say Goodbye” with it's rhyming chorus and so on. You get half time type grooves on “Thinking About You Could Get Me Killed” (and the title track, for that matter) and lots of stellar lead work.

By going all out on ten finely honed tracks, this is a stronger record than, say, “All Hell Breaks Loose”- which was strong in itself. More time together on the road and the studio must surely help- but these rock and roll veterans have been around the block many times, so they know how to deliver anthemic tracks like “True Blue Kid”. Warwick continues his penchant for excruciating puns on “Ticket to Rise”, but title aside, it's a fine low slung groove with some female backing vocals adding an extra dimension. Tough-as-nails/sweet-as-sugar closing statement “Letting Go Of Me” is a rocking note to finish the album on.

Black Star Riders have proved, again, that they are a fine hard rock proposition in their own right and with a strong work ethic, great live show and several albums under their belts, the band seem primed to rule the hard rock circuit. Indeed, a very high UK chart placing for this album shows that the public are taking notice and taking the band to heart, as they should. Catch them live in 2017 and witness the power for yourself.

“Heavy Fire” is available here




Band info: official || facebook


Tuesday, 21 March 2017

ALBUM REVIEW: Mountain God - "Bread Solstice"

By: Ben Fitts


Album Type: Full Length
Date Released: 24/03/2017
Label: Artificial Head Records




“Bread Solstice”, the debut full length from the Brooklyn based doom outfit Mountain God, sounds like a creature born in the depths of a hidden cavern. Wet reverb echoes through the album as if it were splashing off of cave walls and demented vocals wander through the mix like a whisper from the shadows.  “Bread Solstice” is filled subterranean rumbles of fat guitar tone, distant, tortured vocals and chilling aura. It is an album that roars like the echoes of a distant thunderstorm.       


“Bread Solstice” DD//LP track listing:

1).Scaling The Silver Step
2).Nazca Lines
3).Karmic Truth
4).Junglenaut
5).Unknown Ascent
6).Hymn To Nothing


The Review:

“Bread Solstice”, the debut full length from the Brooklyn based doom outfit Mountain God, sounds like a creature born in the depths of a hidden cavern. Wet reverb echoes through the album as if it were splashing off of cave walls and demented vocals wander through the mix like a whisper from the shadows. All the ambience results in a sort of looseness that causes “Bread Solstice” to be the sort of doom album that you feel in your head rather than your gut, but Mountain God prove that that is in no way has to be a bad thing. “Bread Solstice” is filled subterranean rumbles of fat guitar tone, distant, tortured vocals and chilling aura.

The album begins with a gradual fade in on its opening track, the shambling tempo, mostly instrumental “Scaling The Silver Steps”. Vocals make their first appearance on the album at over three minutes into “Scaling The Silver Steps”, and when they do, it is more like the dying hiss of a reptile than a human voice. “Nazca Lines”, the album’s longest track, (at eleven and a half minutes) follows. The track starts with a grimly melodic guitar passage, which is looped as the rest of the band creeps into the mournful clamour. The track unfolds and develops over its remaining nine minutes, but never breaks from the utter bleakness that defines its beginning. The lengthy study of dolefulness that is “Nazca Lines” is followed by the album’s hardest hitting track, the mid tempo, sludgy stomper “Karmic Truth”, creating a very effective contrast.

All the doomy, cavernous echoes to be found on the first three tracks of “Bread Solstice” might as well have been bone dry when compared to the album’s next two tracks, “Junglenaut” and “Unknown Ascent”. While “Junglenaut” has a backdrop of foaming guitar chugging under its beginning, both tracks are washed in so much reverb that they sound as if they are being performed on the top of some massive mountain far away, and the sounds you are hearing are echoes that drift to the valley below. I would imagine this was Mountain God’s exact intention.

The album closes on its second longest song and possible standout track, the nine minute long “Hymn To Nothing”. Beginning with a simplistic drum beat pounding through a haze of wind-like white noise, “Hymn To Nothing” then greets the listener with a frosty bass line that develops into a gargantuan riff once the guitars join. “Hymn To Nothing” is stylistically closer to classic doom metal than anything else to be found on “Bread Solstice” and its occasional breaks into clean sections only add to the intensity once the fuzzed out riffs return. Full of sinister pleasures, Bread Solstice roars like the echoes of a distant thunderstorm.      


“Bread Solstice” is available to preorder/buy here





Band info: Facebook || Bandcamp

ALBUM REVIEW: Pallbearer - "Heartless"

By: Charlie Butler

Album Type: Full Length
Date Released: 24/03/2017
Label: Nuclear Blast |
Profound Lore

 

“Heartless” is an incredible achievement from Pallbearer, a set of huge songs that consolidate the best elements of their previous releases while moving into fresh sonic territory. This is the album that should see the band make the transition into stadium-bothering all-time greats, and deservedly so.

 
“Heartless” CD//DD//LP track listing:

1). I Saw The End
2). Thorns
3). Lie Of Survival
4). Dancing In Madness
5). Cruel Road
6). Heartless
7). A Plea For Understanding

The Review:

Few bands have had quite same impact as Pallbearer over the last 5 years. New LP “Heartless” sees the Arkansas quartet poised to complete their journey from underground doom heroes to all-conquering titans of the genre.

“I Saw The End” begins proceedings in solid if understated fashion, hitting the sweet spot between heaviness and melody the band honed to perfection on last release “Foundation of Burden”. As the track progresses though, there are hints of the more complex journeys to come on this colossal record.

One minor complaint with “Foundation Of Burden” was that the development of their song writing skills came at the cost of the otherworldly funereal atmosphere that made their debut “Sorrow and Extinction” such a captivating bolt from the blue. Pallbearer don’t attempt to recreate their early sound on “Heartless” but by employing more spacious guitar effects and keyboards allied to the knotty compositions of “Foundation of Burden”, they create something very special and take  a crucial step forward in the evolution of their music. This is best demonstrated by “Lie Of Survival”, a spine-tingling doom crawl suffused with dark melancholy that somehow manages to be incredibly sad and crushingly heavy at the same time.

“Dancing In Madness” begins with a similar stirring intro, swathes of maudlin keyboards acting as a perfect backdrop for some mournful lead guitar. Over the course of its twelve minutes it covers everything that makes “Heartless” such a triumph and is particularly effective when it unexpectedly shifts into devastating Crowbar style sludge.

While the highlights of “Heartless” come from the gloomier epics, there are tracks here that see Pallbearer pursue a more traditional metal sound to great effect. Best of these moments is Cruel Road which sees the band at their most up-tempo and aggressive. Brett Campbell’s vocals are at their most classic metal here, channelling Rob Halford at his most commanding in places. It’s an uncharacteristic solid riff onslaught that builds to a brutal chug-heavy breakdown that has an air of Kylesa.   Although Pallbearer’s trademark melodic sound is intoxicating it is cool to hear them cut loose and demonstrate they are a powerful force when they focus on non-nonsense riffcraft. Similarly the band’s crisp, clinical tightness is another key ingredient of their success but it is awesome to hear them revel in the joys of feedback, allowing squalls to rip through bowel-scraping guitar crunches in the mid-section of the title track. This feels especially powerful following the hypnotic cloud of heady drone that envelops the songs first movement.

The record wraps up with “A Plea For Understanding”. This is the biggest departure for the band on “Heartless” and sees them dial back the volume for a yearning ballad that slowly unfolds over its 13 minute duration. It features another stellar vocal performance from Campbell, who begins at a tender almost spoken hush as it builds in intensity as the track reaches its climax.

“Heartless” is an incredible achievement from Pallbearer, a set of huge songs that consolidate the best elements of their previous releases while moving into fresh sonic territory. This is the album that should see the band make the transition into stadium-bothering all-time greats, and deservedly so. 

“Heartless” is available here (Europe) and here (USA and everywhere else)





Band info: official || facebook


Thursday, 16 March 2017

ALBUM REVIEW: Allochiria - "Throes"

By: Andre Almaraz

Album Type: Full Length
Date Released: 17/03/2017
Label: Art of Propaganda


“Showcasing a consistent ebb and flow of heavy riffs mixed with spacey passages, harsh to vicious vocals throughout, and a rhythm section who can stand up to just about any I’ve heard, “Throes” is a rock solid album and Allochiria are set to make a name for themselves in the international post metal scene.”


“Throes” CD//DD//LP track listing:

1). Thrust
2). Little Defeats, Tiny Victories
3). Cracking Fractals
4). Lifespotting
5). Counting Fives
6). Denouement

The Review:

Allochiria is a post sludge metal band from Athens, Greece. Their new album is called “Throes” and it is set to be released on March 17th, 2017. Fans of Isis, RosettaCult of Luna, and Red Sparowes should definitely grab a copy of this recording. The opening track almost immediately ‘thrusts’ you into a mesmerizing groove that doesn’t let up for over seven minutes. Some clever playfulness between the bassist and drummer are prominent as they join forces to make this one stand out right away and serve as a perfect opener. The song swells and fades continuously, never staying with one dynamic for very long which works well to keep the listener interested.

 Second track, “Little Defeats, Tiny Victories,” starts off with an ominous yet groovy bass line that eventually brings us to a point where the whole band joins in and takes us to a much darker place which the first track had only touched on previously. The middle section of the song also has a nice passage where the bassist is given the lead spot and he rightfully owns it. The heavy stomp part at the end of the song leads into some pummeling double kick and then takes the listener into some soaring, celestial guitar work. With the third track, “Cracking Fractals,” we continue down the dark path we entered in track two and also receive a slight twist of fate in which the drummer takes center stage for the first time since the album’s beginning, and he nails it to the floor like a boss. His fluttering hi-hat work is impressive and a perfect accent to the dark jazz flavor of the song. After a couple minutes of spacey groove, everything kicks in and rocks the listener to his knees in a stunning disarray. The ending riff of this song is as heavy as anything you’ll ever hear. The vocalist, who up until now has remained rock solid and ever steady, rightfully answered the unrelenting call to change her tones in accommodation of this heightened viciousness.

 On track four, “Lifespotting,” we begin with a smooth groove which makes good use of some impressive ghost notes on the snare drum before the guitars begin to weep and mourn as they draw us in to becoming a part of this congregation. A mid-song break in the action gives way to more depressing guitars which sound like tortured spirits of regret, yearning for their story to be told. Track five, “Counting Fives,” begins with some swelling Moog like sounds which act as the harbingers of something monolithic that is about to unfold, as it undeniably does within the first minute of the song. More ghost notes and tasteful hi-hat eventually bring the slow boil to a violent head. The bassist is ever plodding along as the guitars soar and fade into oblivion. The mid-song break in this one gives way to some soul searching guitar chords before the heft returns to hit you in the face like a brick and slam you back into a full on attack of the senses.

 The sixth and final track is titled “Denouement” and starts off with a very rhythmic guitar passage as the drums join in shortly after. The drumming in this one is nothing short of brilliant and the melody is unshakable. The sheer grandeur of this song does not disappoint. The middle section has some very nice heavy chugging going on and sounds increasingly maniacal as if something is about to give way, but at over ten minutes in length, this levee does not break as easily as one might foolishly anticipate. Finally, the outro of the song strips away everything but the main driving force behind the entire album; the rhythm section, who have painstakingly proven to keep things punchy and interesting throughout the entire forty-six minutes of total running time. This staggering duet between bass and drums is a fitting and impressive way to end the album. Showcasing a consistent ebb and flow of heavy riffs mixed with spacey passages, harsh to vicious vocals throughout, and a rhythm section who can stand up to just about any I’ve heard, “Throes” is a rock solid album and Allochiria are set to make a name for themselves in the international post metal scene. 

“Throes” is available here


Band info: bandcamp || facebook

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

ALBUM REVIEW: Accept - "Restless and Live"

By: Richard Maw

Album Type: Full Length
Date Released: 13/01/2017
Label: Nuclear Blast


“I like a good live album and this is a great one. Extensive, exhaustive, as hard as iron and as sharp as a rapier, Accept take no prisoners and attain new heights of metallic cohesiveness here. A well packaged and great value for money release. Highly recommended.”


“Restless and Live” CD//DD track listing:

1. Stampede
2. Stalingrad
3. Hellfire
4. London Leatherboys
5. Living For Tonite
6. 200 Years
7. Demons Night
8. Dying Breed
9. Final Journey
10. From The Ashes We Rise
11. Losers And Winners
12. No Shelter
13. Shadow Soldiers
14. Midnight Mover
15. Starlight
16. Restless And Wild
17. Son Of A Bitch
18. Pandemic
19. Dark Side Of My Heart
20. The Curse
21. Flash Rockin Man
22. Bulletproof
23. Fall Of The Empire
24. Fast As A Shark
25. Metal Heart
26. Teutonic Terror
27. Balls To The Wall

The Review:


Accept are a venerable metal institution; widely regarded as having recorded the first thrash or speed metal track with “Fast as a Shark” way back in the very early 80s. Since that time, of course, the band has had line-up changes, disbanded, re-formed and so on. With American singer Mark Tornillo coming on board for “Blood of the Nations” the band were back and, in my view, even better than ever. In fact, “Blood of the Nations” and “Stalingrad” stand as my favourite records, along with “Restless and Wild” and “Breaker”, by these German legends. Yes, Udo is gone, and yes the line up for this live feast is changed once again... but Hoffman and Baltes remain and along with Tornillo they form the nucleus of this powerful musical cell.

Captured on the European leg of the Blind Rage World Tour, this live record is a superb and exhaustive document of all that is great about Accept. Quite simply, this is a kind of cherry picked best of the band, from all eras, wrapped up in a powerful live sound. The band are on form on every track here and the material spans the decades seamlessly. Opening as it does with three latter days tracks (the “Blind Rage” album highlight “Stampede” gets things off to a flyer) and then a “Balls to the Wal”l deep cut, you know the band mean business and that you are getting the full Accept treatment.

At 27 (!) tracks long, this is perhaps a record that will only be listened to in part or on a long journey, but those marketing folks at Nuclear Blast know what they are doing and they deliver two discs- both packed with classics. The DVD and Blu Ray releases are also very well packaged and come with the live album on CD as well. I picked up the DVD and CD for a very reasonable price- money very well spent. As we don't have the DVD for review, and I have not had time to watch it yet, this writing only references the CD/MP3 live album.

Well, back to the music: it rocks, plain and simple. Metal classic after metal classic rips out of the stereo; “Dying Breed”, “No Shelter”, “Living for Tonite”, “Restless and Wild”, “Flash Rockin' Man”, “Fast As A Shark”, “Teutonic Terror”, “Metal Heart”... They are ALL here and ALL played superbly. This band are not young men any more, but they play and sound like they are.

If you have never checked Accept out, the best advice I can give you is to please do so, ASAP! For those that don't know, their sound is a hybrid of Judas Priest, the harder side of AC/DC, Iron Maiden and Motorhead. This is classic metal in every sense of the word and played in a style that is as tough as stainless steel. The band wisely stick to the most rocking material from “Blind Rage” (which was in parts a little too melodic for my taste) and in doing so, show that there is a lot of life left in this band yet. The fact that “Blind Rage” was a number one album in the German charts speaks volumes: this is a band at the peak of their powers. Every band member acquits themselves admirably, with Tornillo's tougher-than-leather vocals holding up extremely well.

I can't wait for the next studio record, but for now this live tour de force will do just fine. I like a good live album and this is a great one. Extensive, exhaustive, as hard as iron and as sharp as a rapier, Accept take no prisoners and attain new heights of metallic cohesiveness here. A well packaged and great value for money release. Highly recommended. 


“Restless and Live” is available here

Band info: official || facebook

11 IS ONE LOUDER: Iowan atmospheric doom trio Aseethe discuss their Top 5 doom (sort of) records

By: Brian Barr, Eric Diercks
& Danny Barr



Thrill Jockey Records continue to bolster the impressive heavy end of their roster in 2017 with the latest LP from Iowa trio Aseethe. “Hopes of Failure” sounds destined to follow in the footsteps of label mates Sumac and The Body and bother many an end of year list come Christmas time.

Over the course of four lengthy tracks the band entrances the listener with their distinct brand of bleak doom. “Hopes of Failure” is sparse and minimal yet packed with detail and intricacies, like Yob and Unearthly Trance, Aseethe’s compositions are stripped of their psychedelic tendencies to let the raw oppressive riffs do the talking. Vocally things are kept to a minimum, carefully deployed when necessary for maximum impact such as the pained howls that accompany the snail-paced downward spiral into misery at the climax of “Barren Soil”. In part Aseethe eschew vocals entirely on, instead relying on aggressive riffage that slowly degenerates into a jerky discordant locked groove reminiscent of Harvey Milk at their most awkward.

On “Hopes Of Failure”, Aseethe have crafted a slow-burning masterpiece that reveals more with each listen. Every spin increases the pull of its hypnotic spell and leaves you with no option but to submit to its crushing power.  Today we have invited Brian Barr, Eric Diercks & Danny Barr, better known as Aseethe to choose their Top 5 doom albums as we take our weekly trip into the extreme, by cranking it to 11.  Why do we go to 11,  because “It’s one louder, isn’t it?”

1). Neurosis – ‘Through Silver and Blood'



“Through Silver in Blood” was a game changer for all three of us. This album is the soundtrack to the apocalypse. It’s dark, epic, abrasive and beautiful from start to finish. In my opinion there isn’t an album that is more poignant in its catharsis. I could probably spend the rest of my music career trying to achieve this level of craft.

2). Mare‘EP S/T’



The writing on this EP is masterful. The discordant chords and amazing riffs carry this entire record. I try to follow the changes in some of the riffs, only to get lost in them. The vocals are both hellish and beautiful. The drums and bass are well done, and compliment the guitar work perfectly. Still hoping they eventually release a follow up.

3). Switchblade – ‘S/T 2009’


This album gets a lot of play in the van. The music is 1 piece divided into 3 parts. “Less is More” is the mantra used by the band, and it is especially apparent on this album. The guitar and bass utilize little gain, instead relying on resonance and sustain to create atmosphere and tension. A minimalist approach to writing adds to its bleakness. They only bring in the fuzzed-out doom in certain key sections for the pay off. It is like Khanate with structure, without much emphasis on the vocals.

4). Examination of the… - ‘The Whitest of Elephants’



These guys started out as a hardcore band, then put out this record. Unfortunately, this ended up being their last release. Personally, it’s one of my favorite records of all time, and I wish someone would give it the vinyl treatment. Recorded by Kurt Ballou, it has the catharsis of Converge combined with the sonic leanings of Neurosis. The album just sounds big and distorted. The drum work alone is some of the best writing I have heard on a doom record. It’s amazing to me that more people don’t talk about this record, because it is fantastic! A definite sleeper.

5). PG. 99 - “Document 7”



What, a PG. 99 record? Besides some fast moments, this album is mostly a slow dirge, only a group like PG. 99 could accomplish. Once again it almost flows as one continues piece. The riffs are discordant and repetitive, with slow building changes. It’s like floating in the ocean, with the churning waves crashing into you.


It was hard for all 3 of us to agree on 5 records, so here are a few honorable mentions:

Will Haven“El Diablo” & “WHVN”
Ocean“Pantheon for the Lesser”
Black Boned Angel - “Verdon”
Khanate“Things Viral”
Isis“Mosquito Control EP”


“Hopes of Failure” is available to buy/preorder here


Band info: bandcamp || facebook

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

TOP 16 ALBUMS: The Sour 16 for February 2017


Let it be known fellow Sludgelordians, “The Sour 16” returns.  The Sludgelord presents the very best riff based music to pour scorn on this desolate day and strike upon us the might of the riff, to inject our veins with sin and guide us on journey of subservice to doom, an act that goes against the very laws and teachings of populist culture, and for those that wish to come with us on our quest, kneel with me as we embrace the thunderous din that is, “The Sour 16”.

You know the drill by now, each month, you the reader are unwittingly compiling a list of the top 16 records of the month, covering all genres of metal.  Is it not a chart, in which reviewers or contributors extol their opinion about their favourite music.  To put it simply, “The Sour 16” are the records that have been trending the most at Sludgelord Headquarters.

The results are compiled based on page views alone and calibrated into the list below.  All reviews can be viewed by clicking the artwork and we have included album streams wherever possible. (Total views since their publication are highlighted in red)

16). Morta Skuld - "Wounds Deeper Than Time" (579)


15). Crystal Fairy - "Crystal Fairy" (629)


14). Woe - “Hope Attrition” (660)


13). Weltesser - "Crestfallen" (711)


12). Grey Widow - "II" (720)


11). Dread Sovereign - "For Doom The Bell Tolls" (739)


10). Brutus - "Burst" (820)
9). Wiegedood - “De Doden Hebben Het Goed II” (924)


8). Psychedelic Witchcraft – “Magick Rites and Spells" (979)

  
7). Darkest Hour - “Godless Prophets & the Migrant Flora” (1011)


6). Death Alley - "Live At Roadburn" (1023)


5). Cult of Occult / Grim Van Doom - "Split" (1096)


4). Sleep - "The Clarity" (EP) (1437)


3). DOOL - "Here Now, There Then" (1439)


2). Unearthly Trance - "Stalking the Ghost" (1526)


1). Widows - "Oh Deer God" (1705)


A big thank you as always to our amazing writers, your dedication knows no boundaries and for that I am truly grateful. February’s  “Sour 16” features reviews by:  Victor Van Ommen, Ben Fitts, Theron Moore, Brandon Green, Charlie Butler, Chris Bull, Jake Wallace, Conor O’Dea & Grim Trashcan