Sunday, 13 December 2015

Giza - "Migration" (Album Review)

By: Charlie Butler

Album Type: Full Length
Date Released: 01/08/2015
Label: Independent


Giza cover a wide spectrum of styles over the course of the four tracks of “Migration”, unleashing a series of tectonic plate-worrying emissions Yob would be proud of. The band lock into a colossal low-end dirge, reminiscent of Pelican during their early period, giving way to more urgent riffing and even a drum solo to close.  This is great release and makes me hungry to hear more.

“Migration” DD//LP track listing:

1). Cenotaph
2). Hasheroid
3). Strawberry Caviar

Giza is:

Richard Burkett | Guitar
Steve Becker | Bass
Justin Rodda | Drums


The Review:

Giza have a real knack for lulling you into a false sense of security. “Cenotaph” kicks off the Seattle trio’s latest opus “Migration” with a lone clean guitar picking out a plaintive melody. This calm is soon broken when the band lurch into some seriously weighty doom. Over the next five minutes Giza unleash a series of tectonic plate-worrying emissions Yob would be proud of.

Hashteroid” begins in similarly calm fashion with spacious acoustic guitar. It is not long before this peace is devastated by the impact of the titular cosmic debris. The band lock into a colossal low-end dirge, reminiscent of Pelican during their early period, giving way to more urgent riffing and even a drum solo to close.

The second half of the album has a markedly different tone to the first. “Strawberry Caviar” continues the pattern of soft beginnings, but this time the tone is more melancholic. The quiet is drawn out and atmosphere built until the drums and distortion arrive after a few minutes, shimmering into life. The heaviness is still there it’s tempered by a melodic edge, offset by squealing feedback from the overdriven bass.

Migration” draws to a close with the 14 minute odyssey of “March of the High Priests”. The track begins with hazy drones, before the band move into a prog-tinged acoustic section. Giza establish a real nocturnal atmosphere here, like Pallbearer on “Sorrow and Extinction”, helped by guest vocals from Irene Barber. On first listen I found the sudden appearance of vocals after three instrumental tracks a bit jarring but after a few spins really came round to them - they add an extra dimension.  The mood soon shifts as crushing volume makes a reappearance, bringing all of the elements of the album together for a satisfying climax.

Giza cover a wide spectrum of styles over the course of the four tracks of “Migration”.  Whilst this doesn’t make for the most coherent listen, they more than make up for this with sheer quality and intrigue. This is great release and makes me hungry to hear more from Giza.

“Migration” is available here




Band info: bandcamp | facebook

No comments: